NOVOS FUNDOS SOBRE A REVOLUÇÃO HÚNGARA DE 1956 NA OPEN SOCIETY ARCHIVES (OSA)

FONTE: New Sources on the 1956 Hungarian Revolution

filermanIn the past few months, OSA acquired two collections to complement its already rich archives on the 1956 Hungarian Revolution.

The first was donated by Professor Gary Filerman, one of the founders and long-time board members of the American Refugee Committee. In 1956-57, under the auspices of the World University Service, Filerman was the director of the student reception center at Camp Kilmer in New Jersey. His task was to process and place Hungarian refugee students entering the US under special immigration permits.

The documents from his experience there include official manuals and reports on the operation of the camp, letters from officials and former students, a few publications, as well as photographs on fighting in Budapest and everyday life in the camp. See HU OSA 412.

The other donation contains the personal papers of Gábor Magos (1914-2000), an agricultural engineer and politician, and a prominent member of the intellectual circle around Prime Minister Imre Nagy during the Hungarian revolt. Among others, he was responsible for liaising between the revolutionary government and the police forces in Budapest. In November-December 1956, Magos was involved in activities against the newly established Kádár government, including preparation of political documents and secret meetings with foreign diplomats. In the last days of 1956 he escaped to Vienna, then went on to Switzerland, and testified before the UN Special Committee on the Problem of Hungary as Witness XXX.

His papers include original documents relating to the revolution and his life in emigration, articles and unpublished manuscripts, interviews, correspondence with the UN and fellow émigrés, and rare Hungarian publications printed in exile.

The documents were preserved, arranged and donated to OSA by his widow, Judit Gimes-Magos, who is the sister of Miklós Gimes, a journalist and politician executed together with Imre Nagy in 1958.

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